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Book review: The Man Who Never Stopped Sleeping by Aharon Appelfeld [Feb. 9th, 2017|07:16 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper
"With its universal themes of healing, recovery, creativity, and finding one’s vocation The Man Who Never Stopped Sleeping should engage the wide readership Appelfeld’s prose deserves. Readers may want to buy extra copies and donate them to VA hospitals." -- from my review in New York Journal of Books.
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Israeli books: A.B. Yehoshua's The Extra features a child-free heroine [Jun. 8th, 2016|03:14 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper

theextraabyehoshuaAbraham_Jehoshua_Yehoshua


"On the surface the new novel is about feminism and the right of women to choose not to bear children. But an underlying theme is whether liberal nationalism is an oxymoron, whether the rights of the individual (the essence of liberalism) can be reconciled with the needs of the nation." -- from my New York Journal of Books review of The Extra by Abraham B. Yehoshua. For an excerpt from the novel see my examiner article.

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Jewish books: in Max's Diamonds family secrets stalk its ambitious protagonist [May. 30th, 2016|04:40 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper
maxsdiamondsbookcover

"Max’s Diamonds, Jay Greenfield’s debut novel published last week by New York publisher Chickadee Prince Books, is a guilty pleasure, a book I enjoyed and could barely put down for its suspenseful serpentine plot despite its pedestrian and occasionally heavy-handed prose." -- From my examiner article. Also see my New York Journal of Books review, which concludes "with Max's Diamonds readers are rewarded with a fun and absorbing read whose fortuitous May publication date makes it a felicitous beach or airplane book."
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Israeli books: Youval Shimoni’s experimental post-modern fiction classic A Room [Mar. 25th, 2016|02:08 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper
ARoombookcovers
In my New York Journal of Books review of Youval Shimoni's A Room I write: "A Room is strongly recommended to readers of post-modern and experimental fiction who enjoy stream of consciousness narratives and who are willing to delve deeper than a thin plot’s surface level."

See my examiner article for additional excerpts from the novel.
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Israeli books: Ronit Matalon's autobiographic novel The Sound of Our Steps [Aug. 4th, 2015|11:51 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper
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"A fictional and more literary tale of an Egyptian Jewish family’s diminished circumstances after immigrating to Israel is The Sound of Our Steps by Ronit Matalon, a novel published today in Dalya Bilu’s English translation by Metropolitan Books. In my New York Journal of Books review I praise it as a 'beautifully written and skillfully translated book that rewards rereading.'” -- from my examiner article Israeli Books: Ronit Matalon's autobiographic novel The Sound of Our Steps
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Jewish books: Joshua Cohen's Book of Numbers is a high tech epic [Jul. 16th, 2015|04:23 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper

bookofnumbersbookcover


What happens when a down on his luck luddite novelist is hired to ghostwrite a memoir by a math whiz tech mogul who shares his (and the author of this novel’s) name? ...At close to 600 pages of dense prose Book of Numbers is not light reading. I close my NYJB review by recommending it to “readers as ambitious as it is.” -- from Jewish books: Joshua Cohen's Book of Numbers is a high tech epic Also see my New York Journal of Books review. A challenging but fun and rewarding read!
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Books: Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere by Georges Perec [Apr. 27th, 2015|03:48 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper

What does fiction about art forgery have to do with Jewish identity?

In my New York Journal of Books review I praise Perec’s first novel as “a fully realized and mature work of fiction.” For a fuller discussion of Portrait of a Man Known as Il Condottiere read my New York Journal of Books review












Portrait of a Man (The Condottiero) by Antonello da Messina (1475,Venice, Italy), Musée du Louvre, Paris, France
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Jewish books: The Empire of the Senses probes Jewish identity in Weimar Germany [Mar. 31st, 2015|03:01 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper

"Alexis Landau’s cinematically descriptive, character-driven debut novel explores ethnic identity via an intermarried family in WWI and Weimar era Germany, i.e. before anti-Semitism became official state policy legally codifying ethnic definitions." -- from my New York Journal of Books review in which I praise the book as “handsomely written” as well as a “powerful and compelling novel.” My additional remarks and excerpts from the book appear in examiner.com.
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Israeli books: Five Selves explores five inner lives [Mar. 12th, 2015|07:20 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper


“...recommended to readers who enjoy interior prose and psychological literary fiction.” -- from my review of Five Selves by Emanuela Barasch Rubinstein in New York Journal of Books. My additional remarks and excerpts from the book appear in examiner.com.
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Israeli books: Gail Hareven's Lies, First Person is a visceral novel of ideas [Feb. 13th, 2015|07:35 pm]
Weirdjewstoo

davidfcooper
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"There are books that make us feel intensely and others that make us think deeply; one that does both is Gail Hareven’s opalescent and psychologically complex eleventh novel Lies, First Person (in the original Hebrew Hashkarim Ha’aharonim Shel Hagoof which literally translates as The Body’s Last Lies), which is only the second (The Confessions of Noa Weber) of her 13 books for adults to be published in English in Dalya Bilu’s fine translation." - From my New York Journal of Books review

"Lies, First Person, Gail Hareven’s second novel to be translated into English (the eleventh of her thirteen adult books published in Hebrew), which is published today by Open Letter Books, is both an emotionally compelling narrative and a novel of ideas. Its characters find different ways of coping with the emotional aftermath of an unreported and unpunished crime, and the novel invites its readers to consider such questions as the nature of evil and the justification of vengeance and retribution." - From my examiner.com article
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